Thomas Demand The Dailies

Kaldor Public Arts opened their 25th installation inviting the public to literally lose themselves in Thomas Demand's The Dailies (2012). Taking over one level of the pod-like CTA building you're invited to follow the labyrinth through the circular hallway and into any of the 15 hotel rooms.

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Being his first work in Sydney and outside of a 'please-don't-touch' museum the installation is a lot more participatory expecting visitors to walk into rooms, open doors and pry open cupboards. It's this reality that gives the artwork its power using a working hotel that makes it more real; that you could be walking into someone's room unannounced, going through their possessions and living their life.

For the installation he created and photographed paper sculptures of typical, mundane objects we use in everyday life, so common that we don't actually see them at all. These 15 prints are the only obvious change in any of the rooms, the rest being subtle which make it all so disconcerting that you need to be more aware of your environment, of life.

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The room has been carefully chosen to appear in such a way, it all looks the same which makes it all a game to try spot the changes. The prints also correlate with shapes you would see from looking out the window, like the one below; the socket is very similar to a metal sculpture above the Tiffany & co entrance. The whole installation shows that everything is a copy of something, that we are repeating shapes and forms and referencing our history/environment.

This is why the venue is so important, walking in a circle, from room to room, looking at seeminlgy identical rooms you feel like you are on a loop.

The whole installation is showing how our environment and life in general is a cycle. John Kaldor who made this exhibition happen and so many others ´╗┐said that this installation is the most intelligent and clever piece they have ever done. 

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