Taking Back the Streets

There is something to be said about public art in its ability to reactivate a derelict industrial-come-residential area or clean the masses from a gentrifying inner city suburb. In both cases it is the state sanctioning the movement of people that prevents the public from using public land how they see fit and landscaping it into their image.

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Over the last few years I have seen the same motif follow me across the city, little moments of typical life frozen in place. Each ‘sculpture’ found was hidden between, behind, on top or next to community infrastructure and street furniture that revealed themselves when you participated in the communal landscape. Borrowing from the sculptures themselves, they recreated mundane scenes like playing on your smartphone, returning a toy doll fallen from a baby’s stroller or throwing away a balaclava after hitting up a convenience store.

Or if you want to get real conceptual, it could be about finding life in the cracks of society. This guerrilla art has become really special to me and by the looks of it so do others, finding penises scratched into the brick blackberry phone or scratches around the piece itself from people failing to pry it away.

I mainly found them on the pylons supporting the monorail track, but more recently I have discovered them behind crevasses, electrical boxes and whatnot. They have become like a little joke to me, like Pokemon I need to catch ‘em all!

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