Thomas Demand The Dailies

Kaldor Public Arts opened their 25th installation inviting the public to literally lose themselves in Thomas Demand's The Dailies (2012). Taking over one level of the pod-like CTA building you're invited to follow the labyrinth through the circular hallway and into any of the 15 hotel rooms.

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Being his first work in Sydney and outside of a 'please-don't-touch' museum the installation is a lot more participatory expecting visitors to walk into rooms, open doors and pry open cupboards. It's this reality that gives the artwork its power using a working hotel that makes it more real; that you could be walking into someone's room unannounced, going through their possessions and living their life.

For the installation he created and photographed paper sculptures of typical, mundane objects we use in everyday life, so common that we don't actually see them at all. These 15 prints are the only obvious change in any of the rooms, the rest being subtle which make it all so disconcerting that you need to be more aware of your environment, of life.

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The room has been carefully chosen to appear in such a way, it all looks the same which makes it all a game to try spot the changes. The prints also correlate with shapes you would see from looking out the window, like the one below; the socket is very similar to a metal sculpture above the Tiffany & co entrance. The whole installation shows that everything is a copy of something, that we are repeating shapes and forms and referencing our history/environment.

This is why the venue is so important, walking in a circle, from room to room, looking at seeminlgy identical rooms you feel like you are on a loop.

The whole installation is showing how our environment and life in general is a cycle. John Kaldor who made this exhibition happen and so many others ´╗┐said that this installation is the most intelligent and clever piece they have ever done. 

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Exploring Space and Time with Anish Kapoor

Although some of the forms of the pieces and sculptures have subtle conforms, there is nothing subtle or discrete in Anish Kapoor's work.

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Sitting in a room all by itself on 2 floors separating it from the rest of the exhibition because of its sheer size and scale My Red Homeland (2003) is an epic piece of wax whose dial slowly rotates around the work engraving and digging into it to create new shapes whilst being a work in progress. The piece of it is really interesting, it looks like rocky, hardened lava, but when you touch it it is soft as putty.

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Sky Mirror (2006) a giant concave mirrored disc guards the entrance of the MCA as a public offering come-reason to get you inside to buy a ticket to the exhibit. At any each time it shows a snapshot of time showing you a different perspective that changes throughout the day and from whatever angle you view it. Viewing the exhibition is similar to the house of mirrors of an old style carnival with huge reflective installations that warp your view. A lot of the sculptures seem to be a flat disc of mirror when often most of the sculpture is hidden by a wall. You feel you are looking at a flat piece of glass because there is a lot of depth or darkness to it, but actually it is a huge cavity.

Apparently, they used to let patrons walk around the zeppelin-like Memory (2008), but after someone tagged the back of it as a guerilla way of becoming part of the artwork, the museum put a stop to that which is a shame because Kapoor's work is all about looking at it from different perceptions.

I wonder how they keep the mirrored surfaces clean because without the white line taped on the ground to form a boundary the sculpture and the room easily blends together.

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