Exploring Space and Time with Anish Kapoor

Although some of the forms of the pieces and sculptures have subtle conforms, there is nothing subtle or discrete in Anish Kapoor's work.

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Sitting in a room all by itself on 2 floors separating it from the rest of the exhibition because of its sheer size and scale My Red Homeland (2003) is an epic piece of wax whose dial slowly rotates around the work engraving and digging into it to create new shapes whilst being a work in progress. The piece of it is really interesting, it looks like rocky, hardened lava, but when you touch it it is soft as putty.

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Sky Mirror (2006) a giant concave mirrored disc guards the entrance of the MCA as a public offering come-reason to get you inside to buy a ticket to the exhibit. At any each time it shows a snapshot of time showing you a different perspective that changes throughout the day and from whatever angle you view it. Viewing the exhibition is similar to the house of mirrors of an old style carnival with huge reflective installations that warp your view. A lot of the sculptures seem to be a flat disc of mirror when often most of the sculpture is hidden by a wall. You feel you are looking at a flat piece of glass because there is a lot of depth or darkness to it, but actually it is a huge cavity.

Apparently, they used to let patrons walk around the zeppelin-like Memory (2008), but after someone tagged the back of it as a guerilla way of becoming part of the artwork, the museum put a stop to that which is a shame because Kapoor's work is all about looking at it from different perceptions.

I wonder how they keep the mirrored surfaces clean because without the white line taped on the ground to form a boundary the sculpture and the room easily blends together.

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