5 Reasons Why You Should Travel Solo

Solo travel is one of the most rewarding journeys anyone can take and nothing scares your family more than telling them you want to visit Egypt or Russia than telling them you are doing it solo. People don’t always understand why you want to travel independently, fretting about safety and loneliness, but do it and show them how much better it is. Although there is no ‘I’ in team, there is a ‘me’ and no one does things better than yourself. Here is a list of 5 reasons why everyone needs to get out of their comfort zone and travel solo.

Five Reasons Why Everyone Should Travel Solo

1. You meet some pretty amazing new friends.

When in the company of a good friend it is easy to rely on them, having the same conversation about Karen in HR and it gets old. It can be hard to start a conversation or even to just approach them, especially if it is someone you would never typically give them the time of day. It is in this moment you find a way to relax, pull your guard down and find that people have all these wacky perspectives and experiences they can share. And remember everyone is in the same position and feels much the same way as you.

2. Learn to read situations and develop a backbone.

Travelling alone can get tough at times because you know -life and you need to learn to read the situation and take ownership. Whether you are dealing with difficult people, inflated prices in a souk or returning a rented vehicle with false claims of damage you need to learn how to respectfully negotiate because there isn’t anyone else you can call. A great skill to learn for everyday life and business.

3. Learn to do things by yourself.

Being by yourself can be a little scary at times and the first thing people are worried about is what will you do all alone. Travelling solo lets you learn to be at peace with only yourself; that you can go to a nice restaurant alone, that not every empty moment needs to be filled with conversation or with the company of a friend. You do laundry at home by yourself and you don’t need an escort right? Just listen to your own thoughts and slowly become more confident and self-aware.

4. It brings you closer to local people

When you’re not hanging off the back of your best mate it is easier to meet locals. Travelling independently is always a conversation starter and it naturally brings you closer to the country you are exploring because it shows you are not after a typical packaged group tour. Many times I have been invited for a beer, dinner or to sing Russian karaoke!

5. Freedom with no judgement

Be your best self and revel in the ability to do whatever you want. Life is short and your time travelling is even shorter so no guilt for wanting to skip a ‘must do’ tourist attraction because your mate has a serious case of FOMO if they are not metres away from the Mona Lisa. Whether you want to dress up for a typical day exploring or want to have a lazy day and do nothing, no judgements here.

For me, I love the freedom to change my plans, to wander a city aimlessly or change countries the next day without having to refer to someone else. 

Song Dong Waste Not

Song Dong 'Waste not' is a large tribute to Dong's mother who growing up in China's Mao period experienced a world of poverty and frugality where nothing was thrown out and goods at the end of their life were made into a new purpose.

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It's a very relatable subject with anyone who lived through the World Wars and Great Depression and now a brave act to open his family to the world. After the passing of his father, his mother hoarded typical products to fill her domestic life, from stacks of soap to miscellaneous crockery and paper.

It's a very personal experience walking around the installation with Dong's whole life and world on show, literally. 10,000 domestic products are carefully categorised, organised and displayed. Even a section of the old family home has been rebuilt as the centrepiece. Its an eerie feeling walking through a strangers home let alone seeing it at its most humble.

It is the most extreme form of sustainability where goods are repurposed with a 2nd, 3rd, 45th life. It makes a comment about modern life where products and lifestyles are designed to be disposable, determining how useful they can be.

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Ryoji Ikeda Datamatics 2

Ryoji Ikeda’s Datamatics 2.0 (2013) is an overwhelming abstract and conceptual representation of matter, time and space through the correlation of sound and visuals in this dynamic audio visual work.

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Conceived through pure data and coding to present a minimalist representation of computer generated imagery and sounds running in the background of your computer and motherboard. Ikeda explores time and space presenting what seems to be a transcript and timeline of a user’s metadata to mirror the user’s behaviour, tracking the intensity of each action.

Datamatics 2.0 enjoys a great physicality with sound and visuals working together as one continuous action to relay the idea the piece is happening live. Sounds and visuals work as one being, rather than reactive senses allowing you to cognitive feel the movement, breaks, pulses and texture of data and information.

I first saw his work at Carriageworks, as part of the Sydney Vivid Festival in collaboration with the International Symposium of Electronic Arts. It was obvious other patrons were more informed about his work hearing people coo during the piece. Before the show, I met a girl who traveled up from Melbourne to view the show only to find a ticket was required. Funny enough the tickets were printed on square pieces of paper that it was easy for her to cut a loose bit of paper and Mugyver it in.

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Test Pattern [Number 5] ran concurrently featuring a large 30m space where you could sit and move amongst computer generated images and data super-imposed over you, like it was a reflection of your own behaviour.

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Trilogy Certified Organic Rosehip Oil Empties Review

Delving down the rabbit hole of skincare it can get a little daunting after introducing additional steps and creating a strata of ampoules, serums and creams. You really start to wonder what am I putting on my skin?

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I really enjoy knowing that the Trilogy Certified Organic Rosehip Oil is a natural and pure oil to care for my skin without all the nasties as Trilogy's website claims organic Rosehip seeds is the sole ingredient. No weak blended tinctures here!

Famous for its all-round benefits, rosehip oil is a rich source of vitamin A (topical trans-retinoic acid), vitamin C and essential fatty acids to repair damaged skin, photoageing caused by UV rays and help the skin regenerate leaving a brighter complection. For this reason I love wiping the excess on my stretch marks, not that I'd admit to any.

Suitable for all skin types including sensitive skin, its neutral PH level helps balance the skin and act as an anti-inflammatory. Personally I bought and tried it to help even skin tone and brighten my skin.  

Available in 2 sizes, they are presented in opaque amber bottles to protect the oil from oxidising in the sun. I usually purchase the small bottle to try keep the contents as fresh as possible.  

For someone with combination skin I find 1-2 drops is ample making a little go a long way.

The Trilogy Certified Organic Rosehip Oil is available at Ulta Beauty.

This product was personally purchased. This page contains affiliate links that help support Culture Redux